G&P. a poetry reading series w/TC Tolbert, Matthew Haynes, & Indrani Sengupta

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Please join us for a reading on Saturday, December 6th at 7pm at Hyde Park Books!

Here’s some more info about our featured readers:

TC Tolbert often identifies as a trans and genderqueer feminist, collaborator, dancer, and poet but really s/he’s just a human in love with humans doing human things. The author of Gephyromania (Ahsahta Press 2014) and 3 chapbooks, and co-editor of Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, his favorite thing in the world is Compositional Improvisation (which is another way of saying being alive). S/he is Assistant Director of Casa Libre, faculty in the low residency MFA program at OSU-Cascades, and adjunct faculty at University of Arizona. S/he spends his summers leading wilderness trips for Outward Bound.  www.tctolbert.com

Matthew R. K. Haynes is the author of 1999 novel, Moving Towards Home, Also, his work has appeared in several anthologies and journals including SOMALiterary Review, O’iwi, Native Literatures, Fringe and Yellow Medicine Review. He was been a finalist for the Faulkner Award in Nonfiction and Writer’s Digest Award in Fiction and Glimmer Train Award for Short Short Fiction. His collection of multi-genre writing, titled Shall We Not Go Missing has been chosen for the Wayne Kaumuali’i Westlake Monograph Series, and is forthcoming from Kuleana Press, University of Hawai’i.  Matthew was a 2010 State of Idaho Writing Fellow.

Indrani Sengupta is a third year poet in Boise State’s MFA in Creative Writing Program. Her work is concerned with queerness, trauma, ritualized defiance, the burden of myth, and the shifting location of selfhood. She was once affectionately dubbed an “existential horror poet,” which made her feel a lot cooler than she did in high school. Currently, she is working on a book of revisionist queer-feminist fairy tale poems (possibly an attempt to resurrect the ghost of Angela Carter), as well as a docupoetry project on sleep paralysis as approximation, or “practice,” for death. Her recent work has appeared in The Feminist Wire and Fogged Clarity.

Come support Boise poetry! 

a poetry reading series.